Cover for The Air Engine

The Air Engine

Stirling Cycle Power for a Sustainable Future

Book2007

Author:

Allan J. Organ

The Air Engine

Stirling Cycle Power for a Sustainable Future

Book2007

 

Cover for The Air Engine

Author:

Allan J. Organ

About the book

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Book description

Two centuries after the original invention, the Stirling engine is now a commercial reality as the core component of domestic CHP (combined heat and power) – a technology offering ... read full description

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  2. Book chapterAbstract only

    1 - The famous engine that never was

    Pages 3-1

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    2 - What Carnot efficiency?

    Pages 13-28

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    3 - Counter-flow spiral heat exchanger – Spirex

    Pages 29-38

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    4 - A high-recovery-ratio combustion chamber

    Pages 39-2

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    5 - The regenerator problem brought down to size

    Pages 55-66

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    6 - The regenerative annulus and shuttle heat transfer

    Pages 67-76

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    7 - The rotating-displacer air angine

    Pages 77-93

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    8 - The strange case of the self-regulating air engine

    Pages 94-106

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    9 - Some light on the inner workings of the ‘thermal lag’ engine

    Pages 107-131

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    10 - New correlations for old

    Pages 135-146

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    11 - Regenerator thermal analysis – unfinished business

    Pages 147-160

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    12 - Flow passage geometry

    Pages 161-178

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    13 - Beyond the performance envelope

    Pages 179-191

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    14 - For the sceptic

    Pages 192-208

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    15 - Scaling – and the neglected art of back-of-the-envelope calculation

    Pages 211-225

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    16 - ‘How to make a business out of Stirling engines today’

    Pages 226-251

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    Appendix I - Draft Patent Specification – Improvements in or relating to Stirling engines and ‘hot-air’ engines

    Pages 252-256

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    Appendix II - Crank mechanism kinematics

    Pages 257-259

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    Appendix III - Equilibrium or ‘temperature-determined’ picture of thermal lag engine

    Page 260

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    Appendix IV - Tribal wisdom

    Page 261

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    References and bibliography

    Pages 262-267

  23. Book chapterNo access

    Index

    Pages 268-276

About the book

Description

Two centuries after the original invention, the Stirling engine is now a commercial reality as the core component of domestic CHP (combined heat and power) – a technology offering substantial savings in raw energy utilization relative to centralized power generation. The threat of climate change requires a net reduction in hydrocarbon consumption and in emissions of 'greenhouse' gases whilst sustaining economic growth. Development of technologies such as CHP addresses both these needs.Meeting the challenge involves addressing a range of issues: a long-standing mismatch between inherently favourable internal efficiency and wasteful external heating provision; a dearth of heat transfer and flow data appropriate to the task of first-principles design; the limited rpm capability when operating with air (and nitrogen) as working fluid. All of these matters are explored in depth in The air engine: Stirling cycle power for a sustainable future. The account includes previously unpublished insights into the personality and potential of two related regenerative prime movers - the pressure-wave and thermal-lag engines.

Two centuries after the original invention, the Stirling engine is now a commercial reality as the core component of domestic CHP (combined heat and power) – a technology offering substantial savings in raw energy utilization relative to centralized power generation. The threat of climate change requires a net reduction in hydrocarbon consumption and in emissions of 'greenhouse' gases whilst sustaining economic growth. Development of technologies such as CHP addresses both these needs.Meeting the challenge involves addressing a range of issues: a long-standing mismatch between inherently favourable internal efficiency and wasteful external heating provision; a dearth of heat transfer and flow data appropriate to the task of first-principles design; the limited rpm capability when operating with air (and nitrogen) as working fluid. All of these matters are explored in depth in The air engine: Stirling cycle power for a sustainable future. The account includes previously unpublished insights into the personality and potential of two related regenerative prime movers - the pressure-wave and thermal-lag engines.

Key Features

  • Contains previously unpublished insights into the pressure-wave and thermal-lag engines
  • Deals with a technology offering scope for saving energy and reducing harmful emissions without compromising economic growth
  • Identifies and discusses issues of design and their implementation
  • Contains previously unpublished insights into the pressure-wave and thermal-lag engines
  • Deals with a technology offering scope for saving energy and reducing harmful emissions without compromising economic growth
  • Identifies and discusses issues of design and their implementation

Details

ISBN

978-1-84569-231-5

Language

English

Published

2007

Copyright

Copyright © 2007 Woodhead Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.

Imprint

Woodhead Publishing

Authors

Allan J. Organ