Cover for Earnings Capacity, Poverty, and Inequality

Earnings Capacity, Poverty, and Inequality

Book1977

Authors:

Irwin Garfinkel and Robert H. Haveman

Earnings Capacity, Poverty, and Inequality

Book1977

 

Cover for Earnings Capacity, Poverty, and Inequality

Authors:

Irwin Garfinkel and Robert H. Haveman

About the book

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Earnings Capacity, Poverty, and Inequality describes the development and application of a way to measure economic status that will avoid some mistakes occurring in methods of measu ... read full description

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  2. Book chapterNo access

    1 - Measuring Economic Status: The Concept of Earnings Capacity

    Pages 1-7

  3. Book chapterNo access

    2 - The Measurement of Earnings Capacity

    Pages 8-21

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    3 - Economic Inequality and the Utilization of Earnings Capacity

    Pages 22-43

  5. Book chapterNo access

    4 - Earnings Capacity and Poverty

    Pages 44-60

  6. Book chapterNo access

    5 - Earnings Capacity and the Target Efficiency of Income Transfer Policies

    Pages 61-69

  7. Book chapterNo access

    6 - Labor Market Discrimination and Black-White Differences in Economic Status

    Pages 70-90

  8. Book chapterNo access

    7 - Earnings Capacity and Economic Status: Summary

    Pages 91-98

  9. Book chapterNo access

    Appendix A - Estimating Lorenz Curves and Gini Coefficients

    Pages 99-100

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    Appendix B - Effect of Randomization on Estimates of Earnings Capacity

    Pages 101-104

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    Appendix C - Composition of the Earnings Capacity and Current Income Poor in the Nonaged Population

    Pages 105-108

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    Appendix D - Earnings Functions from Michigan Income Dynamics Panel Study Data

    Pages 109-111

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    Appendix E - Upper and Lower Bound Measures of the Role of Labor Market Discrimination

    Pages 112-114

  14. Book chapterNo access

    References

    Pages 115-118

  15. Book chapterNo access

    Institute for Research on Poverty Monograph Series

    Pages ibc1-ibc2

About the book

Description

Earnings Capacity, Poverty, and Inequality describes the development and application of a way to measure economic status that will avoid some mistakes occurring in methods of measurement. The book reviews the concept of earnings capacity through different measures of economic status. The authors discuss the procedures used in estimating family revenue, sources of data, and inherent weaknesses in such measures. They consider the degree to which different groups classified by age, sex, race, or economic status use their earnings capacity. The authors compare income utilization of those who are considered poor using both measures of earning capacity and current income. Then, a common government and academic policy known as the target efficient — the proportion of total benefits allocated to poor families — is discussed. The authors cite two important factors: 1) estimates of target efficiency are affected by how poverty is defined and 2) target efficiency of transfer programs changes when the economic status method is used instead of the income method. The authors also examine the effects of labor market discrimination on the earning differences between two races. The text will prove useful for sociologists, psychologists, economists, and students of political science and population demographics.

Earnings Capacity, Poverty, and Inequality describes the development and application of a way to measure economic status that will avoid some mistakes occurring in methods of measurement. The book reviews the concept of earnings capacity through different measures of economic status. The authors discuss the procedures used in estimating family revenue, sources of data, and inherent weaknesses in such measures. They consider the degree to which different groups classified by age, sex, race, or economic status use their earnings capacity. The authors compare income utilization of those who are considered poor using both measures of earning capacity and current income. Then, a common government and academic policy known as the target efficient — the proportion of total benefits allocated to poor families — is discussed. The authors cite two important factors: 1) estimates of target efficiency are affected by how poverty is defined and 2) target efficiency of transfer programs changes when the economic status method is used instead of the income method. The authors also examine the effects of labor market discrimination on the earning differences between two races. The text will prove useful for sociologists, psychologists, economists, and students of political science and population demographics.

Details

ISBN

978-0-12-275850-8

Language

English

Published

1977

Copyright

Copyright © 1977 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Imprint

Academic Press

Authors

Irwin Garfinkel

The University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Robert H. Haveman

The University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin